Grease is not the word

Hazy shade of webcam

Let me begin by saying I’m not downplaying the massive impact that COVID-19 has had on our lives and our livelihoods, not to mention the number of lives it has claimed. It’s been heartbreaking and I do take it seriously: I realised recently that I haven’t set foot inside a building other than my own house in over three months.

It has been exactly a year since a full lockdown was announced in the United Kingdom. …


Or “how we now sing Lucky Voice at home with everyone’s mics up”

Sing it!

In the beforetimes, we would occasionally have people over to our house and use Lucky Voice Online Karaoke to have a good old singalong. While it wasn’t quite the experience from a genuine karaoke booth, it was much more practical with children sleeping upstairs and much cheaper, given that we could sing until the small hours and drink beers from the fridge.

During the recent lockdown I’ve been looking at Jamulus, an open-source audio collaboration tool designed for low-latency, in the context of our choir being able to sing together remotely. …


You too can build a Jamulus server with fast network access that won’t cost an arm and a leg

What this article covers

In this article I will discuss the options for setting up and running a Jamulus server in AWS, then focus specifically on EC2. I will cover example costs for running a Jamulus server, creating a server and installing the Jamulus software, options to get a static IP address or hostname for your server, recording your Jamulus sessions, retrieving the recording files and enabling automatic nightly shutdown to save money,

I will also cover starting and stopping the server, changing the server…


With headless and remote access options

The final Raspberry Pi setup

During these lockdown times, London City Voices has been working hard to find ways for the choir to continue to come together and sing online. While systems like Zoom are great for chatting and listening to “one-way” singing, they don’t work well for group singing due to the significant audio delay and their in-built correction and “catch-up” algorithms. Richard Swan, our choir Director, discovered Jamulus, an audio collaboration tool designed for low-latency, and some of us have been experimenting with it, but it requires a computer to run, which excludes members who either don’t have a computer or only have…


AirWalk was recently asked whether it would be possible to use sshuttle with Session Manager, a part of AWS Systems Manager, so I decided to find out.

The Homer Tunnel
The Homer Tunnel
The Homer Tunnel, by me

What is sshuttle?

sshuttle is a lightweight VPN that can run anywhere you have an SSH connection. It is written in Python and you install it on your client machine, typically with pip. You then tell sshuttle which remote host you want to use and it will connect via SSH and run some more Python on the remote host, creating a tunnel across which you can access arbitrary ports on hosts on the remote network.

If…


Setting up the Open-Source Phishing Framework Gophish on AWS to test your company’s phishing defences.

An Uru reed fish on Lake Titicaca, by me

Introduction

I was recently asked to conduct phishing tests against our own AirWalk employees to assess our susceptibility to attack. We didn’t want to spend money engaging a third party testing company because, as a technology company, we thought we could probably do it ourselves.

In my previous story, Phishing Filosophy, I discussed the things one should consider before spamming colleagues with phoney emails, along with what form those messages should take.

Here I will discuss the practical implementation of the system I used to perform the test. This story will be more technically-focussed than the last.

I will describe all…


Some philosophy to consider before launching a phishing test against your own company

A giant metal fish, by me

I was recently asked to conduct phishing tests against our own AirWalk employees to assess our susceptibility to attack. We didn’t want to spend money engaging a third party testing company because, as a technology company, we thought we could probably do it ourselves.

In another story, I describe the technical steps I took to achieve this using open source tools, in case you want to do something similar yourself. Here I will keep it as non-technical as possible.

Before I launched myself into the murky world of fake emails and dodgy links, I felt that it was important to…

Jim Lamb

is Head of Engineering at AirWalk Reply

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